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  • Originally posted by Donatas Peržiūrėti pranešimą

    Rosomaco svoris apie 25 tonas, Vilko 38,5tonos. O inžinerinių pajėgumų menkai. Kuo greičiau reikalingi BOXER su FFG modulių VILKAMS lydėti
    Aš labiau galvočiau apie skvežimius su šarvuotomis kabinomis.

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    • Įdomus straipsnis apie BORSUK, ypač apie PKM šarvus. Rekmenduoju naudoti vertėją



      The above photo shows a cross-section of the upper and lower frontal armor BVP Borsuk. At the bottom cover there are two steel plates in a spatial arrangement - the front outer plate is inclined at an angle of about 30 ° in the middle and about 50 ° in the bottom. The thickness of both boards is ten millimeters. This spatial arrangement protects the vehicle against penetrating ammunition 23 × 151 mm and 30 × 165 mm. From the point of view of crew and airborne protection, this is insured by additional steel plates dividing the engine and utility space.
      There is no guarantee that using the 3UBR8 missile (30 × 165 mm) with a tungsten penetrator will not damage the Borsuk propulsion unit. This did not have to be taken into account, as the STANAG 4569 standard allows the propulsion unit and other components (which are not part of the armor) to be removed from the vehicle for ballistic testing purposes.

      With regard to the front upper armor, it can be assumed that the upper front armor consists of one steel plate ten millimeters thick, inclined at an angle of approximately 80 °. Such a plate can not only stop 14.5 mm caliber ammunition, but also repel penetrating 20 to 30 mm caliber ammunition. Thanks to this, the vehicle in this area is also protected against 3UBR8 missiles.

      However, in the case of protection against penetrating ammunition from 23 and 30 mm automatic cannons, the indication of resistance to hits at an angle of at least 60 ° should be used for the time being.

      In the case of 3UBR6 missiles (30 × 165 mm), there is a real possibility that the Borsuk side armor protects against hits at an angle of 60 ° at a distance of 500 to 700 meters - which is a typical shooting distance from 20 to 30 mm


      So why hasn't Borsuk been tested to meet STNAG level 5....
       
      Last edited by Jonas; 13 February 2022, 17:03.

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      • Rheinmetall’s proposal for the Greek Amy includes a procurement program of a total of 170 KF41 Lynx IFVs and 200 Marder 1A3s. The German company already has about 200 Marder 1A3s ready for delivery. Simultaneously with the acquisition of used Marders at a cost of around 500,000 euros per modernized vehicle, the Greek army would get a very durable and modern vehicle with a number of proposed improvements (new turret, new laser range finder, new armor).

        The Marder 1A3 is an upgraded version of the Marder family of tracked armored Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFV). The A3 upgrade program began in 1988, with Thyssen-Henschel being awarded a contract to upgrade 2,100 Marder 1 A1/A2 vehicles to the A3 standard at a rate of 220 vehicles a year. The first upgraded vehicles were delivered to the German army on 17 November 1989. In 2000, Thyssen-Henschel became Rheinmetall Landsysteme GmbH to continue the maintenance and upgrades of the Marder IFV family. The Marder 1A3 is the current standard IFV used by the German armed forces but it will be replaced by the new Puma IFV in the next few years.

        In parallel with the two proposals for the acquisition of new and used material programs (modernization of Leopard tanks and Supply of KF41 and Marder 1A3 IFVs), Rheinmetall’s proposal includes financing through lending as well as a series of industrial investments in Greece, so that there would be the best possible transfer of know-how and domestic added value. In the same facilities that will be built from scratch, construction works of trucks and a number of vehicles for the Greek Army may take place, DefenceReview.gr assumes.

        Finally, another potential program from Rheinmetall in which the company has to present excellent proposals and options is the complete upgrade of the Army's rolling stock.

        The German proposals have been evaluated very positively by the Greek Army as well as by the political leadership because flexible financial solutions are foreseen as well as large participation of the Greek defense industry with investments in the country.

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        • Originally posted by Jonas Peržiūrėti pranešimą


          Rheinmetall’s proposal for the Greek Amy includes a procurement program of a total of 170 KF41 Lynx IFVs and 200 Marder 1A3s. The German company already has about 200 Marder 1A3s ready for delivery. Simultaneously with the acquisition of used Marders at a cost of around 500,000 euros per modernized vehicle, the Greek army would get a very durable and modern vehicle with a number of proposed improvements (new turret, new laser range finder, new armor).

          The Marder 1A3 is an upgraded version of the Marder family of tracked armored Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFV). The A3 upgrade program began in 1988, with Thyssen-Henschel being awarded a contract to upgrade 2,100 Marder 1 A1/A2 vehicles to the A3 standard at a rate of 220 vehicles a year. The first upgraded vehicles were delivered to the German army on 17 November 1989. In 2000, Thyssen-Henschel became Rheinmetall Landsysteme GmbH to continue the maintenance and upgrades of the Marder IFV family. The Marder 1A3 is the current standard IFV used by the German armed forces but it will be replaced by the new Puma IFV in the next few years.

          In parallel with the two proposals for the acquisition of new and used material programs (modernization of Leopard tanks and Supply of KF41 and Marder 1A3 IFVs), Rheinmetall’s proposal includes financing through lending as well as a series of industrial investments in Greece, so that there would be the best possible transfer of know-how and domestic added value. In the same facilities that will be built from scratch, construction works of trucks and a number of vehicles for the Greek Army may take place, DefenceReview.gr assumes.

          Finally, another potential program from Rheinmetall in which the company has to present excellent proposals and options is the complete upgrade of the Army's rolling stock.

          The German proposals have been evaluated very positively by the Greek Army as well as by the political leadership because flexible financial solutions are foreseen as well as large participation of the Greek defense industry with investments in the country.
          Panašu, kad kažkam ir Marder atrodo tinkamas ir reikalingas

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          • Originally posted by ARTY Peržiūrėti pranešimą

            Panašu, kad kažkam ir Marder atrodo tinkamas ir reikalingas
            Viskas priklauso nuo jaučiamo grėsmės lygio. Šiaip graikams esminės yra oro ir jūrų pajėgos.

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            • Originally posted by Robis Peržiūrėti pranešimą

              Viskas priklauso nuo jaučiamo grėsmės lygio. Šiaip graikams esminės yra oro ir jūrų pajėgos.
              Čia tikriausiai vyrauja toks požiūris, kad jeigu negali visko turėti naujo tai perkama dalis naujo dalis nenaujo. Svarbiausia šio plano dalis yra tai, kad visi visko turėtų tinkamais kiekiais. Pas mus požiūris, kad reikia visko tik naujo iš principo teisingas, jeigu gali viso to įsigyti tinkamus kiekius. Ir paskutinis argumentas, karui Ukrainoje kol kas atiduodama dauguma technikos (neturiu minty prieštankinių ir lengvų priešlėktuvinių ginklų) kuri anksčiau ar vėliau turėjo eiti į utilizavimą, bet atrodo ji dar bus tinkamai panaudota.

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              • Middle of 2022, assembly first of the 44 ACSV G5 combat support vehicles ordered by the Norwegian Army will begin in Ritek. Flensburger Fahrzeugbau GmbH(FFG) has entered into a contract with Ritek AS in Levanger. Ritek will be the supplier CVA (Complete Vehicle Assembler).





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                • The Slovak MoD selects the CV90 as preferred bidder for its IFV programme

                  27/05/2022

                  By Paolo Valpolini

                  On May 26 the Slovak Ministry of Defence issued a document entitled “Feasibility Study for the Procurement of Tracked Combat Armoured Vehicles and Tracked Combat Vehicles” which draws the conclusions of the lengthy testing process that saw the competing vehicles performing in the country. The document, in Slovak language, lacks some of the information that were considered classified, but gives a general overview of the results obtained during field trials. The five main evaluation points were interoperability, mobility, firepower, mine resistance and ballistic resistance. Combat (PBOV in Slovak acronym) and support (POB) vehicles will replace in Slovak service BVP-1 and BVP-2 infantry fighting vehicles, BPsV Svatava combat reconnaissance vehicles, OT-90 armoured personnel carriers, SVO self-propelled mine-clearing vehicle and MU-90 mine-laying vehicle, all currently deployed by mechanised formations.

                  Four competitors took part in the bid, BAE Systems Hägglunds CV90 (both CV9030 Mk IV and CV9035 MkIV), General Dynamics European Land Systems Santa Bárbara Sistemas ASCOD, Rheinmetall Lynx KF41 and Polish Armaments Group – PGZ Borsuk. The total Phase 1 requirement is for 152 vehicles of which 110 in the combat version, 15 command posts, 9 reconnaissance, 3 antimaterial rifles team, 9 grenade launcher team, 3 recovery and 3 maintenance and repair. As for Phase 2, this should include 5 combat, 10 recovery, 9 maintenance and repair, 9 engineer mine-clearing, 9 engineer mine-laying, 9 engineer support and 20 120 mm self-propelled mortars, for a total of 71 vehicles, the grand total thus being 223.

                  The programme timing sees the delivery of the first combat vehicles in 2023-24 for first trials, followed in the 2025-28 period by the delivery of the other versions for testing and delivery to the units. This

                  According to the released document the preferred bidder is BAE Systems Hägglunds CV90, the offer being supported by the Swedish Defence Material Administration (FMV). This recommendation is now passed over to the Slovak Government, which decision is expected in June, which will then lead to final negotiations before the contract signature.

                  In the following lines a summary of the most interesting parts of the Slovak MoD document.

                  The evaluation took into consideration four main areas, technical, logistical, financial and the involvement of Slovak industry, the assessment being given in percent over target requirements.

                  For the technical evaluation mobility, manoeuvrability, firepower, protection and training assets were the main criteria. None of the vehicles fulfilled completely the requirements, the result table of the technical evaluation published in the document shows the following:
                  Vehicle Rating
                  CV90 MkIV 292
                  Lynx KF41 257
                  ASCOD 279
                  Borsuk 30
                  First came the CV90, although it didn’t meet two requirements, maximum cannon elevation and vertical obstacle crossing. The fact that the Mk IV is based on the wide experience acquired on previous CV90 versions, its combat experience, and the wide community that forms its Users’ Club were of course considered as a plus.

                  Comments on the Lynx positively underline the modularity aspect and the considerable internal space, while on the minus side we find overall dimensions and the fact that the vehicle is not in use in the country of origin, although Rheinmetall was presenting its tracked vehicle through Rheinmetall Hungary Zrt, Hungary being the launch customer for the Lynx KF41

                  Although ranking second in the field, the ASCOD was moved to the third place following the manufacturer information related to noise and vibrations, something that clearly emerged in the testing of the UK Ajax which is based on that chassis.

                  The Borsok ranking is mainly due to the fact that its development is not completed.

                  The security and protection of information and communication systems was also considered, the corresponding table showing the following results:
                  Vehicle Rating
                  CV90 MkIV 83
                  ASCOD 83
                  Lynx KF41 80
                  Borsuk 0
                  The overall results are shown in the following table:
                  Vehicle Rating
                  CV90 MkIV 375
                  ASCOD 362
                  Lynx KF41 337
                  Borsuk 30
                  However due to the aforementioned considerations on the ASCOD vibrations issue, the final ranking is the following:
                  1. Kingdom of Sweden – CV90 (both with 30 mm and 35 mm cannon)
                  2. Republic of Hungary – LYNX
                  3. Kingdom of Spain – ASCOD
                  4. Republic of Poland – BORSUK

                  The first three vehicles were then short listed and carried on a further testing at VTSÚ Záhorie. The Lynx was fitted with a Lance turret armed with the Rheinmetall Mk30-2 cannon, the ASCOD with Elbit’s MT30 fitted with a Northrop Grumman Bushmaster II Mk44S, and the CV90 with the latest d-Turret also with a Bushmaster II.

                  In the shooting tests the CV90 came first, ahead of the ASCOD and the Lynx. None of the turrets met the required number of ready to fire ammunition, the Lance turret being also unable to aim the cannon without using the vehicle power supply. All three competitors met driving requirements, while all of them did not fully satisfied ergonomic features.

                  The financial evaluation was based on a formula where the total cost of ownership was the sum of the vehicle price, a 20 years life cycle estimate, initial training costs, primary logistic costs and spares. The “financial ranking” saw the CV9030 ranking first, ahead of the CV9035, followed by ASCOD and Lynx, the ranking remaining the same after additional information were required by the Slovak MoD.

                  When logistic issues were considered the ranking changed considerably, the Lynx coming first, ahead of the CV90, the two versions being ranked equally, and of the ASCOD, the Borsuk coming last.

                  As for the ability to involve the Slovak industry into the programme, the CV9030 came first ahead of the Lynx, the CV9035 and the ASCOD.

                  In the end the final evaluation of the five original competitors, with the achieved percentages after the evaluation of tenders is the following:
                  Vehicle Achieved percentage
                  CV9030 99.67%
                  CV9035 98.46%
                  ASCOD 88.10%
                  Lynx KF41 76.66%
                  Borsuk 3.53%
                  Following the request of additional information that modified the financial and logistical sections, a final table is provided showing the following results:
                  Vehicle Achieved percentage
                  CV9030 99.67%
                  CV9035 97.76%
                  ASCOD 92.80%
                  Lynx KF41 90.20%
                  Borsuk 3.72%
                  A financial evaluation then follows. Drafting a table based on what is written in the Slovak MoD document brings to the following:
                  Vehicle Cost in € incl. VAT
                  CV90 1,973,570,581
                  ASCOD 1.962.700.133
                  Lynx KF41 2 346 483 109
                  Borsuk n.a.
                  In one of the final statements the document says: “Summarising all available documents, the Swedish offer with CV9030 and CV9035 from BAE Systems Hägglunds appears to be an offer that to the greatest extent meets the requirements of the Slovak Republic Armed Forces for a tracked armoured combat vehicle. The vehicle meets the technical parameters, including those which were determined as key/priority in terms of use for the needs of the Slovak Republic Armed Forces.”

                  Estimated costs for Phase 1, including 35 million € for infrastructures are the following:
                  Vehicle Cost in € incl. VAT
                  CV9030 1,669,093,939
                  CV9035 1 688 845 030
                  ASCOD 1,724,882,231
                  Lynx KF41 1,854,089,739
                  Photo courtesy BAE Systems Hägglunds


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                    • Įdomi nuotrauka - rašo, kad priekyje vikšrinis "Boxer" variantas:

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                        • Estai galėtų pagalvoti dėl CV90 korpusų, kuriuos pirko iš Norvegijos

                          Rafael's fighting capability improvement kit for the CV90 IFV, including: Samson Mk2 remote turret armed with 30mm chaingun, Spike-LR2 ATGM, Trohphy VPS active protection system, Shield-R reactive armor.






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                          • Originally posted by Jonas Peržiūrėti pranešimą
                            Estai galėtų pagalvoti dėl CV90 korpusų, kuriuos pirko iš Norvegijos

                            Rafael's fighting capability improvement kit for the CV90 IFV, including: Samson Mk2 remote turret armed with 30mm chaingun, Spike-LR2 ATGM, Trohphy VPS active protection system, Shield-R reactive armor.





                            Pykdot poną Donatą vien mintimis apie tai )

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                            • Originally posted by Savanoris Peržiūrėti pranešimą

                              Pykdot poną Donatą vien mintimis apie tai )
                              aš pagalvojau, kad Donatui nepatiks nes Samsonui verdiktą jau yra pateikęs ir jo nuomonės niekas nepakeis.

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                              • Originally posted by Savanoris Peržiūrėti pranešimą

                                Pykdot poną Donatą vien mintimis apie tai )
                                Savanori, čia tu turėtum pyktį, kadangi šiuo atveju estai dar kartą įrodytų savo isigijimų nuoseklumą prieš LK, kadangi;
                                1) Įsigydami SAMSONĄ jie jau zinotų jo problemas ir galimai jas isspręstų, kaip padarė Izraelis ir Singapūras,
                                2) jie jau turetų 2 viksrinių PKM batalionus, kai Lietuva neturi nei vieno. Atitinkamai beliktų įsigyti tankų batalioną, ir gautųsi normali mechanizuota brigada. Lietuvoje net artimiausiame dešimtmetyje tai nešviečia, nepaisant kad gynybos biudžetas LK dvigubai didesnis nei Estijos. Taip kad čia jau jūs turite pyktį
                                Last edited by Donatas; 24 June 2022, 11:08.

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